Ecotourism, nature conservation and education Conservation is about the protection, conservation, management or restoration of tropical forests and the ecological communities that inhabit them. In this case, nature protection would seek to manage the human exploitation of natural resources in tropical rainforests for sustainable social and economic purposes. These include the Amazon Protected Areas Program (ARPA), where WWF and the Brazilian government protect 150 million hectares of forests. Another sustainable use is the development of ecotourism. Ecotourism is environmentally friendly tourism, where; • The people involved strive to protect the environment as much as possible • there is visitor training • part of the profits is donated to the preservation of the rainforest • tourism is small with a low density of visitors • Locals are busy and involved Downstairs is an ecotourism lodge where tours of the Amazon rainforest take place. Tourists stay in wooden huts, electricity is limited, waste is processed on site and food is bought on site. All tour guides are local. Rainforests lie between the turning radius of cancer and the turning circle of Capricorn. They cover a large number of forest ecosystems ranging from tropical rainforests to tropical dry forests to mangrove forests on tropical coasts. The « International Day for the Conservation of Tropical Forests » takes place every year on 14 September.

It highlights the threat to tropical forests, whose deforestation and degradation lead to a huge loss of land: in 2019 alone, tropical forests disappeared for a total of 11.9 million hectares. About a third of this destruction took place in primary tropical rainforests, which are extremely valuable to global ecology. Relocation of the crop – Farmers should leave after 2-3 years so that the rainforest can rest. Tropical forests account for 45% of the world`s forests. In addition to their many useful functions, they are also essential for climate protection and the preservation of biodiversity. Tropical rainforests, in particular, are biodiversity hotspots that are home to countless animal and plant species. At the same time, they capture large amounts of carbon and are therefore an important natural carbon sink. Rainforests create the conditions for these ecosystems and thus maintain themselves. If these systems are unbalanced, their existential foundations are also lost. Forests become desert and land that was once fertile is degraded to soils that have no nutrients for plants.

Mangrove forests provide many coastal and marine species with valuable habitat and daycare, ensuring the livelihoods of the local population, who often depend on fishing. It is also an important climate protection, as not only do they store much more carbon than terrestrial rainforests, but they can also protect coastal regions from the consequences of climate change, such as storms and floods. International agreements on the use of tropical forests can be managed in the following ways to reduce deforestation: in tropical rainforests, we should aim to replace all felled trees. Otherwise, there will be no more trees to exploit for future generations and our rainforests will gradually shrink. To preserve the biodiversity found in tropical rainforests, it is important that the same species of felled tree is replanted. The largest contiguous rainforests are found in the Amazon plains, the Congo Basin and Southeast Asia. . . .